Tuesday
May122015

Why Your CrossFit Gym Needs a Front Desk

In the early days, CrossFit South Brooklyn’s “Front Desk” was a broken and badly worn desk I found in the Brooklyn Lyceum, the facility where I was renting space by the hour. On that desk, I kept a pencil pouch with a Post-It note on it that said, “Please leave $20 for class.” There was also a composition notebook where people logged their names as they came in. The pencil pouch was our honor-based payment system, and the notebook was my clumsy attempt at tracking CFSBK’s membership.

This arrangement was the extent of our “Front Desk” for several years until we transitioned over to a software system called Mind Body Online. Then we moved to Volusion, and finally found Zen Planner. Even with the software, and for years after we moved into our current location, our initial point of contact with our membership remained that same pencil pouch full of $20 bills, and our composition notebook upgraded to a three-ring binder.

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Wednesday
May062015

Elevating the Push-Up


Here is our second installment in our "Correcting Common Errors With the Push-Up" series! In this video, I discuss two easy ways to modify push-ups for someone who is on the verge or getting their strict push-ups but not quite there yet.

Elevated Push-Ups

If possible, use an adjustable rack so that the athlete can quantify their progress and adjust over time (lowering as they get stronger). Also, for new athletes, set them up at the bottom of the push-up with their sternum on the horizontal support so they can walk their feet out to the exact point they'll need to be at. Often people arbitrarily set up their feet on elevated push-ups and end up incorrectly aligned as they initiate their descent.

Banded Push-Ups 

Setting up a jump stretch band just below their anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) allows them to scale how much force they need to produce in order to move through a full range-of-motion. This is also great for people who struggle with the bottom few inches—where more of their body weight is being shifted toward their arms—because as they descend, the band is stretching out, creating more tension and thus more support as they descend.

We'll be back soon with another ITA video!
Monday
Apr202015

How To Fix the Push-Up

Above is a video demonstrating some common cues we use for our general population CrossFitters as they execute push-ups. Check it out and see if it helps your athletes move more correctly! We wrote out the cues below, too. 

Sagging Midline

Verbal cues
"Belly-button touches the floor last."
"Lead with your belly-button off the floor." 

Tactile cues
+ Place your hand on their lumbar vertebra and ask them to "Lead here" as they come up.
+ If your athlete has been doing push-ups with a soft midline they will say this version feels harder. Say "Good!" 

Sagging Neck/Shoulders

Verbal cues
+ Getting your athlete oriented vertically and having them experience the sensation of trying to be taller with good posture is a much more readily available sensation most people can quickly organize. Set that as the default position to think about before getting into a prone orientation. "Get long" or "get tall" could encorage this while doing push-ups.

+
Initially explain that they need to keep their chin and nose behind the wall on the way down. I find that specifically mentioning to push their chin and nose back prevents cervical overextenion which many would otherwise default to. "head back" or something similar would work as a briefer cue once they get the concept.

Tactile cues
From a kneeling or standing position, use your arm or PVC to create a line from their sternum up to their nose and have them imagine saying behind it on the way down.

If they're too weak to organize this, you may want to elevate them. More on that soon!

Monday
Mar162015

Why Your Gym Should Program Rest Days

Any effective strength and conditioning programming has to account for work-to-rest ratio in order to manage stress and allow the body to adapt to training. CrossFit often teaches the three-on/one-off template, as well as the five-on/two-off template. At CrossFit South Brooklyn, way back in 2008, we started using a three-on/one-off, two-on/one-off template, which has worked extremely well for us. This schedule allows our athletes to train at high intensities throughout the week while not overextending themselves, and it provides our gym with a consistent programming template and weekly schedule.

We all know rest is important, but an obstacle to rest for many affiliates is accounting for programmed rest days while remaining open seven days per week (which is a practical and financial necessity for most gyms). The two most common solutions we’ve seen affiliates come up with include either offering seven days per week of novel programming, or running alternative, low-intensity programming on particular days—perhaps a skills class, Active Recovery, or just open gym time. We’ve also seen gyms simply close on Saturdays or Sundays, which creates a mandatory rest day for their populations. At CFSBK, our membership options and three-on/one-off, two-n/one-off template allow athletes to take up to five CrossFit group classes per week. We additionally provide various skill classes (yoga, Pilates, etc.) and open gym time. This allows us to offer seven days per week of attendance options without compromising our programming, and this precludes overzealous members from coming in every single day and training themselves into the ground.

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Monday
Mar092015

CrossFit Solace: Inside a Manhattan Gym

Basic Statistics

Affiliate name: CrossFit Solace

Location: 38 East 32nd Street, New York, NY

Year started: October 2014

Estimated number of members: 300 and growing

Square footage: 11,000 square-feet

Gym owner’s name/s: Tristan Keeffe, Jim Loperfido, and Chad McDonald

Number of full-time and part-time trainers: 16

ITA: Tell us the story about how your gym started. 

Tristan Keeffe: Jim and I initially met working out at EVF on the Upper East Side in 2012. We began discussing the idea of opening a CrossFit gym after investors showed interest in providing capital for Goattape, a company Jim was a major owner of. In January 2013, we set out in earnest to raise capital for our vision of what a CrossFit gym could truly be. 

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